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Important Alerts
Office and Urgent Care Closures

Cardiology-Jersey City is temporarily closed, while Cardiology-Newark is closed permanently.

The Croton-on-Hudson lab and the Patterson lab are temporarily closed until further notice.

Updates

Effective June 17, 2024, Maryanne Wysell, MD, Jason Rubin, MD, FACP,  and Saad Yousuf, MD, have moved back to the Poughkeepsie Columbia Campus located at 30 Columbia Street, Poughkeepsie, NY 12601.

To make an appointment with former CareMount Women’s Health, please call the office directly. Online scheduling has been temporarily suspended.

Optum Medical Care, P.C. (formerly CareMount) has upgraded our billing system to ensure that you have a simple, clear and convenient payment experience. To securely view and pay your bills online, visit pay.optum-ny.com.

Effective Tuesday, February 20, 2024, changes have been made to the New York flu clinic hours and locations. Please check the webpage for the most up-to-date information.  

Recording/Photography Not Permitted on Premises

COVID-19 Information and Updates

The new COVID-19 vaccine is available at our clinics.

Please note available supply below:

– Supply is limited as we receive weekly deliveries.
– Moderna is available for children and adults (ages 6 months and up)

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Healthy Mind

Break the stigma: The importance of talking about mental health

1 May, 2023
Produced by:
Break the stigma: The importance of talking about mental health

As we continue to navigate through a global pandemic these past few years, many are struggling with mental health challenges such as increased anxiety and depression.1 According to The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), during late June of 2020, 40 percent of U.S. adults reported they were struggling with mental health issues or substance abuse.2 These abnormally high numbers have disproportionately affected younger adults, racial and ethnic minority groups, essential workers, and unpaid adult caregivers.3

In fact, according to the National Alliance on Mental Illness out of the 1 in 5 U.S adults experience mental illness and nearly 1 in 20 adults live with a serious mental illness.4 However, only 42.2% percent of adults with a mental illness received mental health treatment in 2020.5

Recently, there has been a reported increase in poor mental health among adolescents, which can impact many areas of a teen’s life and increase stress on families.6 The CDC reports that in 2021, more than 4 in 10 (42%) students felt persistently sad or hopeless and nearly one-third (29%) experienced poor mental health.7 Making sure teens feel connected to school and family is very important in helping them grow into healthy adulthood.8

Since May is recognized as Mental Health Month, it presents an opportunity to educate yourself and others on mental health conditions and treatment options. Although exploring mental health treatment options, which includes psychotherapy (also known as talk therapy), medication, or self-care, can be confusing or difficult, is important in taking the first for help.9

Some important messages to remember this Mental Health Month are:

  1. You are not alone. Millions of people in the U.S are affected by mental illness each year. By acknowledging how common mental illness is, we can better understand its impact and reduce the stigma.10
  2. Self-care such as practicing yoga or meditation, eating well-balanced meals, staying physically active and getting plenty of sleep, are healthy ways to help cope with stress so you can better take care of yourself and in turn, be in a better position to help take care of others.11
  3. Connect with others by talking to people that you trust about your concerns and how you are feeling.12 Conversation is a powerful coping tool that may help manage stress and help promote resilience.13
  4. Consider talk therapy, which may be an appropriate option for you. Telemedicine can be a tremendous help to people particularly for people who are unable to get in-person treatment.14,15
  5. Educate yourself by talking to your doctor or using online resources. The more you know, the more you can dispel misinformation or myths that can increase the stigma around mental illness and hold people back from receiving the treatment they need.
  6. Talk to your child about mental health. Feeling connected to family and school can have a significant impact on their mental health, so communicating openly and honestly with your child provides them with a sense of connectedness.16
  7. If someone you know needs help, listening to them in a comfortable and non-judgmental way can be a good place to start.17 It’s important to genuinely express your concern and avoid blaming, criticizing, minimizing or assuming things about their experience.18 If you or someone you know is struggling or in crisis, help is available. Call or text 988, or chat 988lifeline.org to reach the 988 Suicide & Crisis Lifeline.19
Disclaimer:

If you or someone you know have thoughts about suicide, seek help right away. If you or someone you know is in immediate danger, call 911 or go to the closest emergency room.

To talk with a trained counselor, you can call the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline any time at 1-800-273-TALK (1-800-273-8255).

Individuals may need mental health support for a variety of reasons including obtaining help during a stressful time or successfully dealing with a life-long struggle with depression or another serious mental health condition. Even if you are just curious about symptoms of anxiety or depression, Mental Health Month is a good time to have discussions about mental health and do your part to break the stigma.

  1. Mental Health, Substance Use, and Suicidal Ideation During the COVID-19 Pandemic — United States, June 24–30, 2020 | MMWR (cdc.gov)
  2. Mental Health, Substance Use, and Suicidal Ideation During the COVID-19 Pandemic — United States, June 24–30, 2020 | MMWR (cdc.gov)
  3. Mental Health, Substance Use, and Suicidal Ideation During the COVID-19 Pandemic — United States, June 24–30, 2020 | MMWR (cdc.gov)
  4. Mental Health By the Numbers | NAMI: National Alliance on Mental Illness
  5. Mental Health By the Numbers | NAMI: National Alliance on Mental Illness
  6. Mental Health | DASH | CDC
  7. Mental Health | DASH | CDC
  8. Mental Health | DASH | CDC
  9. Mental Health By the Numbers | NAMI: National Alliance on Mental Illness
  10. Mental Health By the Numbers | NAMI: National Alliance on Mental Illness
  11. Stress and Coping Resources (cdc.gov)
  12. Stress and Coping Resources (cdc.gov)
  13. Talk: Start A Conversation | How Right Now (cdc.gov)
  14. What To Expect – FindTreatment.gov
  15. What To Expect – FindTreatment.gov
  16. Mental Health | DASH | CDC
  17. Tips For How to Help a Person with Mental Illness | NAMI: National Alliance on Mental Illness
  18. Tips For How to Help a Person with Mental Illness | NAMI: National Alliance on Mental Illness
  19. Mental Health By the Numbers | NAMI: National Alliance on Mental Illness